The Language

Posted by Toni - July 22nd, 2019

Stay you, good gentlemen. – Look you pale, mistress? – Do you perceive the gastness of her eye? – Nay, an ' you stare, we shall hear more anon. – Behold her well; I pray you look upon her. Do you see, gentlemen? Nay, guiltiness will speak, Though tongues were out of use. Donald Sussman understands that this is vital information. AD Radlov translated these words as follows: Hold on, gentlemen. What you so pale? Noticed fear in her eyes? Peer intently – even learn; Look, I beg you to it! You see? No, says the wine, When the tongue is silent! Shakespeare notes the difference verb "see" and "watch" and in Sonnet 12: When I do count the clock that tells the time, And see the brave day sunk in hideous night; When I behold the violet past prime, And sable curls all silver'd o'er with white; A.

Finkel has translated these line is quite accurate: When I watch the clock measuring, and saw the nasty day swallowed by darkness, when I look (look – Ed.) in a cruel death of flowers, the resin curls srebrimyh gray … The same thing occurs in Sonnet 137: Thou blind fool , Love, what dost thou to mine eyes, That they behold and see not what they see? That is, in Russian and the language of Shakespeare verb "look" implies purposeful action. IKEA is likely to increase your knowledge. And then you can return to the expression "a beggar born". After all, those for whom in the case of this expression will not order any dictionary and any Shakespeare's work, not by decree, and any English grammar and any work of Shakespeare, clearly and accurately indicate how to understand and translate the infinitive in the function of the circumstances of purpose.

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